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Adriana M. Garcia

Medium: Digital image transfer on ceramic tile
Dimensions: 11’H x 117’W
Locations: Between Santa Rosa Avenue and Martin Street

About the Artist: Born and raised on the West Side of San Antonio, Garcia is a graduate of Carnegie Mellon School of Art (Bachelors of Fine Art). She frequently works with community youth and has completed murals with the South West Workers Union, Bihl Haus Arts, and San Anto Cultural Arts Center. She has been a workshop leader and teacher at Sanford-Brown University, Say Si, Trinity University, Artpace, and Museo Alameda, among others. In addition, Garcia has been a speaker at the National Association for Chicana and Chicano Studios (2013) in San Antonio.

Website: https://adrianamjgarcia.com


The composition tells the story of how San Pedro Springs brought forth life, growth, and diversity in the San Antonio community. The left represents the west; the right represents the east. They come together (figuratively and literally) in the center of the mural.

Details: On either end we see the moment of contact when the Payaya people (members of the Coalhuitecan Nation) who were settled along the San Pedro Springs, encounter the settlers. These were Governor Don Martín de Alarcón, Father Antonio de San Buenaventura y Olivares, Father Isidro Félix de Espinosa, and the Canary Islander families. Time gets closer to the present as we move toward the center of the piece, where the San Pedro Springs come forth.

The mural is bookended by the telling of the story, our story, San Antonio’s story. The mother and father figures represent the passing down of our heritage from generation to generation and speaks to the cycle of life. The indigenous story of the Anhinga water bird gathering sustenance from the Blue Jaguar river spirit swirls from the storyteller’s lips.